I imagine myself as an insect flirting with a neon electric trap and God shouting, “Light, Linda, light, so I can zap you with current of my Spirit!”  Normal life has a way of filling up all moments of it to capacity with good things that need our attention and leaving no occasion for the best things.  Abundant life, however, demands that our hearts be fed daily with God-time.  What that would look like for each of us cannot be put into some kind of formula, such as thirty minutes of quiet time at a certain time of day.  Rarely can any one person’s life be so scheduled.

The Psalm that says to “Be still and know that I am God” comes from a passage of scripture that contains references to mountains being carried into the sea, roaring waters, heathens raging, kingdoms being moved and the earth melting.  Sounds like the daily life of any wife or mother, right?

“There are mountains of laundry, roaring stomachs, televisions raging, children moving and I’m melting, and you are calling me to be still, Lord?”

Interestingly enough, God is calling us to be still in the middle of the mountains, not when they are gone.  He reminds us that He is our refuge from the stress and our strength during the “busy”ness of our daily lives. Often we have to literally steal moments of God-time in the midst of our daily routine.  For those of us who also suffer from attention deficit disorder, focusing on Him is doubly challenging, but His promise is peace and joy for those who choose to swim in His presence.

Yes, I did say swim in His presence.  That same passage of Psalm makes clear that there is a river that runs through the City ofGodand that He is in the midst of it.  Imagine that river running through your daily routine and being available to you 24/7.  Imagine its beautiful, still waters that beckon you to immerse your mind and heart for just a moment to help you focus on His work in your day after day obligations.  Let Him take you into His current and help you float through your commitments of the moment.

Brother Lawrence (1614 to 1691) was a poor, obscure monk whose conversations have been recorded in a little book called The Practice of the Presence of God. “We can do little things for God,” he wrote. “I turn the cake that is frying on the pan for love of him, and that done, if there is nothing else to call me, I prostrate myself in worship before him, who has given me grace to work; afterwards I rise happier than a king. It is enough for me to pick up but a straw from the ground for the love of God.”

Abundant life beckons us, dear ladies, with the practice of the presence of God.  Zap!

This post was written by Linda Hutcherson. To read more about her, click here.