river-of-lifeOne thing I love about God’s Word is that it’s always fresh and relevant. Just when you think you’ve read a Scripture a hundred times, God can shine His light on it and cause you to see a whole other level of meaning. Even so, I think it’s easy sometimes to fall into the “been there, done that, got the t-shirt” (or bumper sticker, or refrigerator magnet) trap. Especially for folks who have grown up in church, the power of the truths that we hear preached over and over again can seem to get lost in their familiarity.

So what’s the solution?  Be a river. Jesus said, “He who believes in Me, as the Scripture said, ‘From his innermost being will flow rivers of living water.'” (John 7:38 NASB) We’re meant to let life flow from our hearts. We’re meant to take what we’ve been given and share it with others.

Do you know why the Dead Sea is dead?  It’s constantly being poured into, but it has no outlet. This results in a toxic situation in which nothing can live. The Jordan River flows in, but then the water is trapped and eventually just…evaporates.  If the Gospel seems stale, powerless…it’s not a problem with the message. Maybe it just doesn’t have an outlet. Allow the Good News to flow and see if that doesn’t bring life to all involved.

Proverbs 11:25 says, “Whoever refreshes others will be refreshed.” (NIV) Another version says it this way: “He who waters will himself be watered.” (NASB)

We know all about the need for water here in West Texas. We’re all too familiar with drought. We would think it was crazy if a farmer had an irrigation system with a full well and he never used it to water his crops. No one would just sit there and watch his harvest literally shrivel and die just because he made a choice to keep the water for himself. Let’s not make that mistake as Christians. There are people all around us–in our own circles of influence–who desperately need the life-giving water we’ve been given. We’re meant to flow. We’re meant to be refreshed…inspired…ALIVE…and that’s what happens when we become a river.

This post was written by Becca Wilhite. To read more about her, click here.